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Bavarian infantryman - 1870-1871 summer outfit by ManuLaCanette Bavarian infantryman - 1870-1871 summer outfit by ManuLaCanette
Copyright Eagles of Empire.

A little sample of what I'm doing within this miniatures project. Here's a Bavarian infantryman of the 4th regiment's summer uniform (distinctive yellow cuffs and collar). Everything is pretty accurate: the only mistake I noticed (too late, but maybe I'll fix it) is that the buttons of the Waffenrock are supposed to be silver for the 4th, 5th and 6th regiments, not golden like most other regiments.
The helmet (boiled leather) is the famous Raupenhelm who's characterizing the bavarian army since the Napoleonic era. The pattern represented is the older one M1861 (two patterns were used during the war, the M1861 and the M1868).
The rifle represented is once again the old Podewils, a muzzle loader pattern (Lindner) converted into a breech loader (hence the funny breech position in the back) just before the war, but it still uses the old percussion system. Still a very bad rifle for its time, below the 300m effectiveness range (and in reality was below), it started being replaced by the top-notch Werder patterns (production started in 1869) during the war but only a couple regiments were fully equiped with Werder rifles when the conflict ended.
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:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
That soldier looks awesome.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! :)
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:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
No problem. I'm 1/16 German. i'm related to the Miller and Brill families. The Brill family is from Munich and the Miller family is from Stuttgart.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Hey, Pennsylvania or Missouri haha? I know that once upon a time (late 19th c.) some states of the USA were up to 80% German! :D Given that both sides of your family are german you must be from a big community!

I had great moments both in Stuttgart or Munich myself (involving Oktoberfest or not haha). Very nice cities all the way. 

Thanks again for appreciations!
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:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
well they came from missouri.
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The Raupenhelm is pretty cool, but i prefer the Pickelhaube  i think.

I remember you did a uniform "comparison" of the Franco Prussian war, have you thought about doing one for the Great Northern War and perhaps the War Of The Spanish Succession? Would be a fun way to study the various military fashion of the early 18th century.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Hehe, Pickelhaube is indeed hard to compete with in terms of class and bling! But I must say I got a thing for everything Bavarian or Südeutschland in general haha! 
I will certainly release a similar uniform staged comparison at some point as GNW still remains my main focus, and that ain't gonna change. WSS, yeah I already thought about painting French or Spanish uniforms who looked pretty cool at that time, on the opposite of the British (they looked cheap in my opinion, and they actually were if you look at the official army prescriptions: basically it says "go for the cheapest stuff"). 
Now Great War, I don't know yet, as I got plenty of things on the platr with GNW and projects. I don't know how you feel about this conflict as a Swede by the way, but I must say that, as a Frenchman, I got pretty much "filled" with Great War and WW2 in history classes at school, at university and in the medias and TV as well. Those conflicts, along with Algeria, are everywhere in France, hence my "meh" attitude towards GW. But I'm still thrilled by WW2. I'll always be!
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Edited Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well i'm gonna be honest i don't know much about German uniforms other than a few Prussian, hehe.

Then i'm looking very much forward to your GNW and WSS comparison, i don't know alot about this era so it would be a very fun picture to study. I'm not sure i know exactly how the British troops looked other then a lot of red cloth, but i do know that their officers looked a bit more dandy then the Swedish!
Also i guess i should thank you! Your GNW drawings have helped me overcome a bit of the melancholy of the GNW and i have actually started to read up a bit on the subject, although it still fills me with the worst melancholy i've ever met in a history book!

WWI and WWII i find interesting in the sense that it changed the world and all that, but in general i don't read about it. I guess it's mostly because Sweden didn't officially take part(we were just neutral in favour of Germany in both wars), although there were lots of Swedish volunteers in both world wars.
Also i'm not that fond of the world that came after the wars so i tend to read about the world before it. And i should mention that WWII is basically THE only historical conflict that they teach in Swedish schools, and even then they only preach about how awful the holocaust was. So i pretty much got  "filled" with WWII(WWI they pretty much told us like this: Imperialism caused a lot of people to die, THE END.) in school as well. I mean we weren't  even in the war FFS!! :P
I prefer WWI over WWII actually, but i think that's mostly because WWI is almost never mentioned in Sweden. And  the uniforms are much, much better!! In WWII Only the Germans looked good and after they lost, the whole world adopted ugly American uniforms...

P.S. You don't happen to know any good uniformal plates showing Polish troops from GNW?
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Edited Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
This one is shortly after the end of the war, and as new regulations only came in 1728, it is most likely accurate for mid-late GNW polish regular infantry (style and cut).

militarist.milua.org/zolnierz_…
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Edited Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm really glad my stuff helped to overcome some of those feelings! ^^

Frankly I don't know any good artwork about GNW polish uniforms. What I know is that the thing westernized during the war. At the start of the conflict, the Commonwealth seems to rely still upon the mid-late 17th century fashion and composition: "foreign troops" (i.e. the dragoons, cuirassiers, or disciplined musketeers) wore western-like clothes but still used traditionnal attributes like the polish fur hat and the curved saber. After the "Deluge" these "foreign" troops seem to have been used more extensively by Poles as the traditional levy troops proved themselves untrustworthy. 
Aside of that, the elite Husaria troops remained the main asset of Polish forces, while Lithuanian or southerners, Ruthenians... units apparently kept their traditionnal outfit and fighting style (Cossacks style) more longer than core Polish forces.
I know that the red dominated in the western-like uniforms: red jackets with light-blue facings for infantry (and most likely all "foreign" troops), breeches and socks would have been blue as well during GNW: the 1728 regulation set those white I think. The tricorn use seems to have be introduced during the conflict, I don't know when exactly. 

Here's a polish dragoon plate that should be accurate for 1690-1710's (the fur cap would have been replaced by tricorn at some point). 

www.wfgamers.org.uk/resources/…

This polish book contains most likely some good GNW plates but some of them don't have any color, and I can't read Polish xD Besides, it's kind of ancient so mistakes might be over...

militarist.milua.org/zolnierz_…
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes reading about the war the crushed your country's glory days, is melancholy in its purest! But i have come to the conclusion that even though we lost and the Freedom era crushed what little was left, i can still be proud of that we were tough and went out all guns blazing :D

It sound indeed as if they haven't changed much since the mid 1600's, one would have thought Carl X Gustaf would have teached them that.
Well thanks for the info, now i at least know some of what to look out for :)
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Well they learned something from the Deluge for sure: foolish cavalry charges against pikes (that mostly happened during the early Thirty Years War though) stopped and they used western tactics more exentsively, but yeah, you can't keep up with half a century of military advances in 5-10 years so... Even what Peter the Great did on Russian army was mostly superficial: he put russian army on the rails of modernization but the real process eventually succeeded after the war: Even Poltava was mostly won by Russian expendable numbers and field fortifications (although their real impact is highly questionnable). Still Russians earned a real advantage over the Ottomans and their puppets in the upcomming 1722-1723's war.
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah well haven't Russia always relied on manpower over tactics? I'm reading War & Peace at the moment and every time they loose a battle it's the same; The Germans(Referring to both the foreign officer and the allied Austrians) betrayed us, but our lads fought valiant! :D
Also if you look at the wars between Sweden and Russia during the 16th and 17th century, then the Swedes are always concerned over the vast amount of troops Russia can muster.
This is very obvious if you look at the Russo-Swedish War of 1554–57 aka the Great Russian War since Gustaf I had no money to recruit foreign mercenaries and had to rely solely on native troops.
And battles like Battle of Kivinäbb where 12 000 Russians stood against ca 500 Swedes, and the haughty Ivan Bibikoff rode forth and toasted the Swedes and then threw the goblet contemptuously in the snow, the Swedish response was to blast him with a canon! And then the Swedes attacked on skies and slaughtered some 600 Russians, mobility versus quantity!

I don't know enough about Poltava to speculate, but as far as i've come to understand is that there was a few mistakes done by the Swedes. And you can really question the surrender at Perevolochna by Lewenhaupt.
Are you familiar with the surrender at Perevolochna? It's quite famous in Sweden because Lewenhaupt askes the troops wether they wanted to stay and fight or surrender and the storie goes that the troops replied: Why are you asking us? Before you have never asked us, for it has always been: March on! We can not say that we shall beat them, but we want to do all that is human and possible!

I think it was Gunnar Åselius that said that the secret weapon of the Swedish empire was the fact that we could muster our native men in an organised and well functioning army before all other. And when they finally caught on and applied such a system for themselves then they would have the upper hand since they had bigger populations and then could muster armies of vast manpower. Hence this idea that whether Charles XII would have won or lost the Swedish Empire was still doomed since the Russians probably would have kept coming until they got what they wanted.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Edited Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
By the way, here, Alsace was a certain time (1632-1634) occupied by Sweden during the Thirty Years War (a very very dark time for the Rhine region), and there's a saying here that Swedes left their blood there in many ways (some apparently remained here by desertions or after the main army retreated), and a few people today would still bear a nordic-like patronym that would have been "germanized" after. But most invaders the locals called "Swedes" at this time were in fact German or Swiss mercenaries... But who knows?
Speaking of what, I know that my family was kicked out of germanic Switzerland after the rebellions (1653) next to the Thirty Years War: mercenary families (peasants who lived mostly thanks to the mercenary service) from this area (valleys around Luzern, like Entlebuch) had their revenue suddenly dropped because of the belligerants stopped paying the cities immediatly after the war, even though they still owed them, and the cities stopped paying the mercenary service's rents to the soldiers' families. This and tax raises led to revolts in Switzerland, and retaliations has been harsh...
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I knew about this story about Lewenhaupt's speech (well the idea of it, not the exact quote), but I don't know anything further about Perevolochna for now! And yes, I share the exact same analysis than you here: military advances did spread really quick in Europe because of the relative small area it represents reported to the number of different states that were in war within it and had to compete with each others. Every serious power had military observers in the other powerful countries. At the entry of the Thirty Years War, the Dutch observers in Sweden sent detailed reports over the Swedish tactics and gear. 
If it wasn't for a clever and brilliant man like Peter, the Swedes would have kept the upper hand maybe a couple decades until the Russians would realize they need to change (because the population weren't actually pushing for anything to change, they and the nobility were conservative), so it would necessarly have been up to a strong leader to deal with military reforms in Russia. So if Peter failed here somehow, who knows how much time Russia would've waited for a strong enough leader to force his views on the army and society in general? Maybe Sweden would have gained enough time to strenghten its positions and keep at least a part of it (not talking about the places in Germany, those Sweden would have lost them at some point anyway ; but the Baltic areas). 
Keeping the Russians away from the Baltic window long enough would have maybe choke them, I don't know. I don't think dealing with the Russians alone would have caused too much trouble for Sweden in some defensive wars if Poltava never happened, but dealing at the same time with European coalitions, yeah, that's another problem...
Feel you though! 
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