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Battle of Helsingborg (1710) - Jonkoping Regemente by ManuLaCanette Battle of Helsingborg (1710) - Jonkoping Regemente by ManuLaCanette
This scene represent the action of the Jönköping regiment at the battle of Helsingborg (February 28, 1710).

THE BACKGROUND:

This Swedish victory, won by General Magnus Stenbock, marks the last Danish attempt to take back the Scanian lands from a weakened but still fierce Sweden, just after the disaster of Poltava (1709). Some regiments were almost completely destroyed at Poltava, the rest needed to be manned again. Jönköping regiment suffered heavy losses during Karl XII's campaign and thus have seen its uniforms stlightly tweaked in 1710. The regiment kept its distinctive colour (red) for the military vest (facings, linings). But for the rest, likewise in other regiments, the clothing issued in haste in 1710 to face the Danes were common standard stuff: breeches and waistcoats issued were yellow, the wollen socks were undyed grey/white instead of their previous red colour. The headgear were also standardized: while previously many Swedish regiments had the distinctive military cap called "Karpus". We don't know fully the reach of these uniform tweaks concerning Jönköping, but I assumed that remaining Karpa hats were kept while the merged men or new recruits were issued the standard white trimmed tricorn hat, as it was specified in the military prescriptions of the time. 
I also represented a couple of soldiers wearing the grey overcoat with red facings, normally issued to the regiment.

THE BATTLE:

The view is there put on the center of the regiment (Jönköping was placed in the first line of battle), composed of pikemen, while in the rear and on the flanks the musketeers are deployed. Magnus Stenbock, most likely because of weaponry shortage though, decided to stick with the 1/3 pikemen of the numbers for most regiments. We must observe that a couple of Swedish regiments at Helsingborg were fully composed of musketeers. Still a lot of pikes remained in this 1710 Swedish army. 
Meanwhile, Danes already completely abandonned the pike in their army. They relied on musket fire and bayonets only. 

Amazingly, Helsingborg showed how the combination of pikes, muskets and the offensive military doctrine of the Caroleans were still effective against European armies who skipped the pike too early in this beginning of the 18th century. Basically, the whole Danish lines collapsed as soon as melee combat threatened them, as the Danish fire -- although constant -- didn't succeed to break the Swedish steady and unforgiving advance, despite serious casualties at some points of the battle line. 
Only remained two Danish elite units: The Grenadiers Corp (an artwork will be fully dedicated to them) and the Livgarden til Fods (Foot Guards), here represented on the right of the scene. Those regiments, despite a desperate situation, stood fast until the very last moment (when rumors of a rear attack of the Swedish cavalry did occure) in order to cover their fellow men's retreat. By this sacrifice, they most likely saved many men from the slaughtering Swedish dragoons who went in pursuit. 

The flags represented are both historically accurate, the one of the left is the flag of the regiment, the one on the right is the Colonel's flag. 
Although Heslingborg was a very foggy day, the fog was mostly gone at this point of the engagement, but I still represented it because of the ambiance and the dramatic effect.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconpoyntingve:
Poyntingve Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2017
We must charge at those musketeers!!
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:icondowntownalpha:
DownTownAlpha Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2016
Dem glorious colonial era uniforms
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:iconstariander:
stariander Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2015  Student Photographer
Riktigt Snyggt!
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2015  Professional General Artist
Tak! :D
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:iconcaptaintightpants:
captaintightpants Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2015
Wow, awesome work.

Are the breeches and waistcoats yellow (or buff)?

A favourite era for me (an Englishman), though many of my friends know nothing :(
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2015  Professional General Artist
Thanks! :)

Those are supposed to be straw yellow, it's actually kinda halfway from buff and yellow, but still yellow. 

A great historical period indeed, especially in a military history perspective! 
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:iconluzur:
Luzur Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2015
Also, the pikes are too short, but i guess it was due to size of the picture.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2015  Professional General Artist
I guess picture frame set limits, but the Höglund actually says Swedish pikes were 4.5m max under Karl XII, while most previous century pikes were 6m long, which roughly fits the lenght featured in the artwork. 
The pikes in the early 18th c. French army were even shorter than that, with 3m regulation. From Osprey book on Peter the Great's army, we also learn that Russian pikes from GNW were exactly 3.40m long. Far from their 17th c. counterparts then. 
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:iconluzur:
Luzur Featured By Owner Edited Aug 28, 2015
Very, very good work, you should do more Swedish battles, Narva, Duna, Gadebush, Poltava, Fraustadt etcetc!

One thing though, according to the expert guy i know,  beards where not really accepted (maybe during marches or battle when there where no time to shave,) proper facial discipline was held in the swedish army, although mustaches where allowed according to paintings and other pictoral documents.

also, "Karpus" ;)
Reply
:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Edited Aug 29, 2015  Professional General Artist
That's the plan indeed! I think about 3 more artworks for Helsingborg (Danish Grenadiers' stand, Fynske Regiment, and Swedish dragoons on dirty job). Then I think I'll move onto Narva (1st battle, and maybe something about the siege of 1704), because of the epicness.

About the beards, yes I thought so, but since I got your confirmation it's duely noted! 
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Lovely!
I'm not sure about this but it think that redheads aren't that common in Sweden, i think it's more common in Denmark than in any other country in scandinavia.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2015  Professional General Artist
Thanks! :)

Haha, last time I checked it's about 5% in European countries and around 10% in UK, Ireland and Northern countries (along with 50 to 70% blond people, in all variations). I try to respect these stats more or less in the faces variations.
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well i've lived in Sweden all my life and i've barely seen a redhead, but i've been to Denmark two times and they swarm down there:D I'm just saying that redheads aren't exactly associated with Swedes, at least not by ourselves.
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:iconmanulacanette:
ManuLaCanette Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2015  Professional General Artist
I actually checked it out for Sweden and it appears you're quite right: they can't explain it for sure, but the amount of redheads in Sweden is actually below the 2%, almost none in some regions! It's really weird considering Norwegians or Danes, being neighbours, got superior numbers! Really interesting actually, I always thought all Scandinavians were more or less from the very same ethnicity. Should be that Swedes had less contacts with Celts, I don't know..
I'll take that into account for the future Swedish faces though!
Reply
:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well there's probably a bunch of reasons, i'm not that good att genetics and all that so honestly i don't know. But it is true, it's uncommon here.
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